Magic The Gathering for Homeschooling

Nina’s Note: Our older kids have been seriously involved in Magic The Gathering game lately. They go to weekly local play sessions and participate in tournaments. They also play at home almost every night. Initially, I thought it was a waste of time. Now I realize that the game is beneficial to the kids and can be extremely useful for our homeschooling. It helped my kids develop better social skills and reduced their performance anxiety. By playing together, they bond with each other and with their Dad and learn to work as a team when they help each other and teach the game to their younger siblings. My kids also show great improvement in their reading, math, and strategic thinking skills. So I asked Kon – who himself is an avid player and who introduced the kids to the game – to write this article describing the game and its benefits.

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Do Your Homeschooled Kids Want to Go Back to School?

Sometimes homeschooled children want to go back to school and their parents wonder how to keep them interested in home education. This problem usually happens when the child previously attended school and misses his or her friends from there. Friends who go to school can easily provide the necessary outside influence.

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Advice to Kids: Sometimes You Cannot Be Anything You Want to Be

The information we give to kids about careers is often feel good unrealistic nonsense. When you daughter says she wants to be a famous singer and she does not have a musical ear, why do you tell her she can do it if she works hard? She will most likely never become a singer. Year after year, thousands of aspiring young singers show up for auditions with great expectations, only to learn that they don’t possess the skills they thought they did. The same goes for sports: only select few make it to the top, so if your child has average athletic abilities, why do you let him believe he can be a professional athlete?

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I Don’t Worry About Early Childhood Education

Maybe it’s different for you. For me, the best memories of my childhood were those moments when something unexpected, spontaneous happened – something that would break out of a schoolchild’s monotonous routine. Like skipping school or playing on the streets with friends after school. I have fond memories of these moments, but I don’t have any lasting memories of school classes or after-school activities that my parents put me in.

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Homeschooling vs. Schooling: Two Different Goals

I don’t think that homeschooling is necessarily superior to schooling. True, many schools have problems, such as too much sedentary time indoors, political brainwashing, poor quality of instruction, perverted sex ed, bullying. But if you can somehow find a nice private or charter school without all these problems, then everything will probably be fine. Absent these negative factors associated with most schools, the homeschooling model is not necessarily superior to the school model. It’s just that these two models serve two different goals, so you need to pick the model that is best suitable for your goal.

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Boredom is Good: the Case for Self-Directed Learning

We once signed up our daughter for private piano lessons. She loved it while it lasted. After a while, we decided to stop the lessons and see what happens. She didn’t miss it and never asked to resume the lessons. Neither did she continue piano on her own. She adored the lessons while they lasted, but once they stopped, she lost interest. The same exact story happened with whatever we signed her up for: gymnastics, clay, Jiu Jitsu.

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Letting Kids Watch TV

Parents often have a hard time setting rules for their kids regarding watching TV. Should we even have a TV? Do we limit TV time? What programs are allowed? Here’s how we do it.

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